New Online ISASP Testing

Payton+Lewin%2C+Carlee+Smith%2C+Jenna+Philipp%2C+Jadyn+Peyton+and+other+students+get+tangled+in+a+human+knot+after+taking+the+reading+ISASP+test.
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New Online ISASP Testing

Payton Lewin, Carlee Smith, Jenna Philipp, Jadyn Peyton and other students get tangled in a human knot after taking the reading ISASP test.

Payton Lewin, Carlee Smith, Jenna Philipp, Jadyn Peyton and other students get tangled in a human knot after taking the reading ISASP test.

Helen Temeyer

Payton Lewin, Carlee Smith, Jenna Philipp, Jadyn Peyton and other students get tangled in a human knot after taking the reading ISASP test.

Helen Temeyer

Helen Temeyer

Payton Lewin, Carlee Smith, Jenna Philipp, Jadyn Peyton and other students get tangled in a human knot after taking the reading ISASP test.

Sabrina Welcher, Staff

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Keyboards and computer screens replaced the ITED booklets and the number two pencils for the new ISASP assessments this year.

Robin Mebus, director of school improvement, explained that this new assessment, created by Pearsons, aligns with the state standards as part of the Every Student Succeeds Act. ESSA was put into law in 2015, to replace the No Child Left Behind Act.

According to Mebus, this assessment was created to be more adaptable, and, depending on how students answer the questions, it will help dictate their next questions.

“I think some people had anxiety because they had never used the online system before,” teacher Jordan Pollock said. “Now that we have used it, I think more people will like the new system.”

Teachers across the state will look over the answers and develop proficiency and readiness indicators. Mebus estimated the scores will be back in September or October.

“I really liked the new online testing,” sophomore Laney Demmer said. “It was nice that there was no time limit. I could take as long as I needed and not feel rushed.”

To prevent cheating, Joe Hegland, director of technology, installed an app similar to a lockdown browser on the Chromebooks.

Hegland explained that the teacher console allowed them to see what the students were doing on their Chromebooks. For example, if the students logged off the tests too early or tried to look up answers, the teachers were aware of it. Also, once the student exited the test, the teachers had to let them back into the test.

Another concern was if the Chromebooks and the internet could handle all the testing.

“The biggest fear I had was whether or not our network/internet would be able to handle 900-1,000 kids on their Chromebooks at once going to the same place to do the test,” said Hegland, who was happy with the results. “It worked great!”

Hegland stated that he was pleased with how the Chromebooks worked. He believes that using Chromebooks, instead of PC Laptops or MacBooks, was the best option.

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